Scientific communications

Combination of in vivo monitoring and flow cytometry-based immunoprofiling on syngeneic tumor models

05 / 24 / 2019

Syngeneic tumor models were becoming invaluable for preclinical development and evaluation of immuno-based therapies in the presence of a functional immunocompetent system. Explicyte is providing a series of syngeneic mouse models including subcutaneous and orthotopic models, which were fully characterized in terms of their responsiveness to immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) and their immune infiltration features using a high throughput-compatible flow cytometry platform.

M2 Macrophage Suppression Assay

03 / 13 / 2019

Our newly validated M2 suppression assay based on i) the co-culture of autologous monocyte-derived M2 macrophages and activated CD4+ T cells (or PBMCs) and on ii) the quantitation of IFNg levels as surrogate of T cell activation, is specifically designed to assess new immunotherapeutics for their modulatory activity on the phenotype and function of M2 macrophages. 

Candidate compounds can thus be evaluated as single agents or in combinatorial treatments, for their potential to repolarize / switch M2 macrophages and to antagonize M2-mediated T cell suppression.

Intratumoral microdialysis-based approach to assess tumor immunometabolism & specific immunometabolic pathways-targeting

02 / 20 / 2019

Syngeneic tumor models were becoming invaluable for preclinical development and evaluation of immuno-based therapies. Nevertheless, the immunometabolic features of these tumors models, which may likely underlie responsiveness to immunotherapies, are still not well understood and become thus primordial to be defined for tumor model characterization and selection of the appropriate ones, for target validation, drug development, and assessment of the efficacy potential of drug candidates.

Neutrophil chemotaxis assay for cancer immunotherapy screening

12 / 06 / 2018

Besides their antimicrobial functions, neutrophils are likely infiltrating many types of tumors and increasing evidence correlate the tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) with poor clinical outcome thereby supporting their role in tumor development. Recruitment of such TANs is indeed driven by key chemokines including the prototypical CXCL8 (IL8) or CXCL1 produced by tumor cells or its microenvironment. In turns, TANs might be involved in the recruitment of other immune cell populations (eg. Tregs, TAMs, etc), all together maintaining the local immunosuppressive microenvironment. Therefore acting on neutrophil recruitment and migration represents a valuable cancer immunotherapy strategy.